Korean Filtration and Separation Society (KFS)
Korean Filtration and Separation Society (KFS)

Welcome Address
Director/Professor Chul Woo Lee

Regional Innovation Center for Industrialization of Advanced Chemical Materials & Clean Technology Institute, Hanbat National University, Daejeon, Korea
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As chairman of Hanbat National University’s Regional Innovation Center for Industrialization of Advanced Chemical Materials and Energy & Clean Technology Institute, I proudly welcome you to the 5th Korean Filtration and Separation Society Conference. Our institute and the KFS society will be co-hosting the conference this year, which we hope will be another informative and valuable conference for all the attendees. In accordance with this year’s theme, “Innovation in Filtration and Separation”, we hope the program presents innovative developments in the filtration and separation field and provokes scientific discussion that may even spur further innovation. I extend my best wishes that you have both a productive and enjoyable conference.

Keynote Speaker
Professor Jinying Xi

School of Environment, Tsinghua University. Beijing, China
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Title: Application of Biotechniques in Industrial Waste Gas Treatment: the Experience in China
Abstract:
The presentation will introduce the challenge in the field of biological VOCs and odor control in China firstly. Then the research effort done by some Chinese research groups in the area of biofiltration will be well addressed. Finally some cases of biological waste gas treatment in some typical industries will be introduced.
Dr Jinying Xi is an associate professor in School of Environment, Tsinghua University. He got his Ph.D. degree in Environmental Science and Engineering in 2005 at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and worked as a visiting scholar in School of Engineering, Duke University, USA in 2011. His research area is VOCs and odor control technology. He is now serving in several Chinese academic societies for VOC and odor control and works as a convener in ISO TC142 WG13 “Biological equipment for waste gas treatment”. He completed dozens of scientific projects sponsored by Chinese governments or enterprises. He supervised a lot of research on biological waste gas treatment and published more than 80 papers in academic journals.

Keynote Speaker
Professor Kihong Park

School of Earth Science and Environmental Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Korea
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Title: Characterization of Physical, Chemical, and Toxicological Properties of Fine Particles in the Ambient Atmosphere
Abstract:
Fine particles in the ambient atmosphere (particulate matters less than 2.5 um (PM2.5)) are of current interest due to their strong association with adverse health effects and climate change. Fine particles are produced directly from various sources (primary aerosols) and are also formed via a gas-to-particle conversion process (secondary aerosols). They can be transported over long distances, deposited by settling, and mix or react with other species (aging process) in the ambient atmosphere. It is essential to measure physical and chemical properties of fine particles to determine their sources and to understand their effects on human health and climate change. By identifying sources of the fine particles, efficient control and mitigation measures can be established to reduce them. Also, it is unlikely that all fine particles are equally toxic due to their different sizes and chemical components caused by various sources and particle formation pathways. In this talk, starting with the current status on PM2.5 in Korea, characterization and measurement techniques for PM2.5 will be introduced followed by several examples resulted from recently measured chemical and toxicological properties of ambient fine particles in Korea and China.
Dr. Kihong Park is a professor and director of PM2.5 characterization center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in Korea. Prof Park is an Editor in Aerosol Science and Technology (AST), USA and an Editorial Board member of Aerosol and Air Quality Research (AAQR). He obtained his PhD at University of Minnesota in USA in 2003 after his BS and MS had been completed at Seoul National University. He had worked as an Assistant Research Professor at Desert Research Institute (DRI), USA and a Research Associate at National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) and University of Maryland before he joined the current position at GIST in 2005. He was a leader of PM2.5 Research Consortium (2014-2017), and now is a PI of National Leading Research Lab (NLRL) program (2011-present) and international monitoring of PM2.5 in Northeast Asia (National Strategic Project for PM) in Korea. He has worked on development of new aerosol measurement techniques, PM2.5 monitoring, PM2.5 source characterization, PM2.5 toxicities, new particle formation, and so on.

Keynote Speaker
VP. Martin Klein,

MANN+HUMMEL Himmelkron, Germany
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Title: Filtration Solutions for Clean Mobility
Abstract:
Climate change is one of the major threats to humanity. In order to limit its negative effects, the global temperature increase should be limited to 1.5 °C. Since almost a quarter of the relevant CO2 emissions originate from road transport, it too must make a positive contribution to cutting CO2 emissions. In addition, air pollutants like NOx, PM2.5 and ultra-fine particles pose a significant threat to human health and the populations of many cities all over the world are suffering from the bad air quality.
Today’s economies are dramatically changing, triggered by development in emerging markets, the accelerated rise of new technologies, sustainability policies, and changing consumer preferences around ownership. Digitization, increasing automation, and new business models have revolutionized other industries, and automotive will be no exception. These forces are giving rise to four disruptive technology-driven trends in the automotive sector: diverse mobility, autonomous driving, electrification, and connectivity [1] Electrified powertrains help to reduce the above-mentioned emissions. Both battery electric vehicles and fuel cell operated cars are being operated without local CO2 or NOx emissions. What are the filtration needs of electric vehicles when the classical oil-, diesel-, or engine air filters are no longer required? Which opportunities does connectivity and the new vehicle design concepts provide for improving the cabin air quality? Fuel cell technology will play a major role in reducing transportation-related emissions, especially in heavy-duty, long-haul applications. Consequent transfer of technology from air supply systems for combustion engines to cathode air paths serves as an enabler for necessary system cost reduction. To achieve the required system lifetime, the supply of clean air is essential. Gases like NOx, SO2 and NH3 poison the catalyst, leading to increased stack degradation rates.
Martin Klein studied process engineering at the Karlsruhe University and since February 2017 has been Vice President Cabin Air Filtration at MANN+HUMMEL, Germany. He started his career at MANN+HUMMEL in 2003 as a development engineer for fuel filter media and ele­ments for the automotive aftermarket. In 2010, after projects at the Indian location in Tumkur, he moved to the department Innovation and Corporate Strategy and most recently managed national and international teams there.

Keynote Speaker
Devine Damertey Sewu (speaker) and Seung Han Woo

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon, Korea.
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Title: Application of Biochar Adsorbent for Wastewater Treatment
Abstract:
Biochar, the solid carbonaceous residue of biomass pyrolysis, has great potential as an adsorbent in wastewater treatment applications owing to its surface area and surface functionalities. However, cost-related issues arising from separation hurdles, post-adsorption, especially for powdered grades render it uneconomical. To overcome this challenge, this study utilized goethite (10% w/w), as a magnetic precursor, with firwood biomass in a thermochemical process to produce magnetic biochar. Extensive characterization – physicochemical and magnetic properties – of the newly fabricated magnetic biochars was performed, as well as wastewater treatment tests with malachite green (MG) and congo red (CR) as the model dyes (500 mg/L). The magnetic biochar exhibited a nanostructured surface with satisfactory BET surface area (209 m2/g), high magnetic saturation (20.8 emu/g), and good dye adsorption capacity of 234 mg/g and 241 mg/g for MG and CR, respectively. High magnetic biochar recoverability was observed upon the application of external magnets of strength, 3.14 kOe, to the adsorbent-adsorbate mixture, post-adsorption. The aforementioned results showed that biochar, when magnetized, could serve as a viable adsorbent for wastewater treatment-cum-easier post-adsorption separation potential using external magnets.
Dr. Devine Damertey Sewu just received his doctorate degree under the direction of Professor Seung Han Woo, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon, Korea.
Dr. Seung Han Woo is professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Hanbat National University and CEO of Life Green Technology Co., Ltd. He was a visiting professor at Cornell University (Johannes Lehmann Lab.) in 2012/2013, and post-Doc at Northwestern University (Bruce E. Rittmann Lab.) in 1998/1999.

Keynote Speaker
Dr. Kyung-Ju Choi

CTO, Clean & Science, 2775 Algonquin Rd., Rolling Meadows, IL 60008, USA, Chair of KFS
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Title: Filtration Performance of Room Air Fibrous Filters as Electrets
Abstract:
Due to the adverse health effects of fine dust particles cited by EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency) and CARB (California Air Resources Board), it is critically important to maintain high filtration performance throughout the life of filters for at least 6 months or more. Long life of Room Air Fibrous Filters must start with the lowest possible initial pressure drop and maintain low resistance across the unit filter. Therefore, current Room Air Fibrous Filters are “Electrets”. The performance of new and used room air fibrous filters were evaluated using an air filter testing rig in addition to CADR (Clean Air Delivery Rate). Various electrostatic charging technologies will be described.
Dr. Kyung-Ju Choi is CTO of Clean and Science, Rolling Meadows, IL since 2011. He was an adjunct professor of Chemical Engineering in the University of Louisville from 1996 to 2011, and in the Tennessee Tech University from 1986 to 1995. He was with AAF (American Air Filter) International as Director of Global Media Development from 1995 to 2009. He was Sr. Staff Scientist with Cummins Filtration from 1986 to 1995. He is Chairman of KFS and was Chairman of AFS in 2010/2011.

Keynote Speaker
Professor Eunkyoung Shim

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
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Title: Analysis of Nonwoven Filter Media Structure during the particle loading process and their effects on dust loading behavior
Abstract:
Authors: Sung Yu and Eunkyoung Shim
Ideal filter media should exhibit high filtration efficiency at low-pressure drop and have long filter life (i.e. high dust holding capacity). Controlling and engineering various aspects of filter media structures poses critical importance to achieve these goals. Many reported the effects of media structures on filtration efficiency and pressure drop of a clean filter. But these do not address performances of a filter throughout its lifetime as it collects dust particles inside its structures. During the filtration process, particles are captured from an air stream and entrapped among the fibers inside. It alters filter media structures- solidity, pore structures, etc. It will lead increase in pressure drop and eventually end the filter life. One of the main challenges in the filter design is to create filter media structures that ensure a long life span. This requires an understanding of particle deposition behaviors – such as distribution particle deposition through the thickness direction of filter media, changes of pore structure and clogging– and how initial filter structures affect them. We utilize X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) to non-invasively characterize the 3D structures of clean and particle-loaded fibrous nonwoven coarse filters at different clogging stages. The image processing and image analysis method were developed to visualize and analyze both the filter structure and particle deposition distribution across the filter depth.
Dr. Eunkyoung Shim is an assistant professor in the department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science at North Carolina State University. This appointment followed 15 years of experience in the Nonwovens Institute as a research assistant professor and research associate. She received Ph.D. in Fiber and Polymer Science from North Carolina State University in 2001.Her research areas includes nonwoven filtration media, charging technology, fiber spinning, nonwoven and fiber structure analysis, nonwoven process mechanism, fiber modifications with additives and fiber/nonwoven product developments. She had published 5 books chapters and 32 articles in the peer reviewed journal. She has developed and taught graduate courses and workshops and short courses, including materials, polymer and fibers, nonwoven processing & products, nonwoven characterization.

Keynote Speaker Professor Peter P. Tsai

University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN, 37996 USA
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Title: Numerical Analysis of Promising Approaches in Making Electrets for Air Filter Media
Abstract:
Nonwoven fabrics are commonly used as air filter media thanks to their high porosity contributing to low pressure drop (PD), and their high fiber surface area presenting high filtration efficiency (FE). Nonwovens made of polyolefin are suitable for electrostatic charging that increases the FE ten to 20 folds depending on the charging methods including corona, induction, and triboelectrification, to name a few. Among them, corona discharge usually accompanied by field induction contributing to ten-fold efficiency compared to uncharged ones is a simple, convenient, and most commonly used charging method in terms of hardware structure, cost, and ease of operation. In contrast, triboelectrication is a more expensive and more tedious process using two or multiple materials having different levels of electronegativity to generate charges by friction of one way of another although promoting a double-folded higher FE than the corona charging. However, the higher the FE is improved by the electrostatic force, the higher the decrease of the FE by the particle loading depending on the particle types. Quiescent FE decay is another issue of electrostatically charged media.
In this presentation, promising methods of electrostatic charging will be addressed. The numerical characterization of the charges embedded in the charged media will be presented. The improvement of FE by charging will be discussed. The quiescent charge decay and that by particle loading will be theoretically and experimentally detailed.
Dr. Peter P. Tsai is a senior research professor in Textiles and Non-wovens Development Center of University of Tennessee and a world renowned expert in the field of textiles. He is also member of academic defense committee for master's degree and doctoral degree of textile major, material science major as well as Electromechanical Engineering of University of Tennessee.
He is also an avant-garde of meltblown technology, patent holder of atmospheric pressure plasma, inventor of high-efficiency N95 filtering respirators, and the 2006 B. Otto and Kathleen Wheeley Award winner.

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